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Friday, March 18, 2016

#SocialCurrentSee : #FOIA



From time to time at our common interest development (aka HOA) in the Inland Empire of Southern California (Trilogy Glen Ivy) we have an issue that requires information requests to management and/or the board of directors.  Usually, those requests pertain to actions or discussions held by the board in private, executive session.  According to the California Davis-Stirling Law there are only a few specific topics that can be discussed in those private sessions. All other information is intended for homeowner record and review, but not for the general public or the press because private enterprises like HOAs are not subject to laws like FOIA.

Hard to believe that the FOIA law is 50 years old in 2017.  The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. § 552, is a federal freedom of information law that allows for the full or partial disclosure of previously unreleased information and documents controlled by the United States government. The Act defines agency records subject to disclosure, outlines mandatory disclosure procedures and grants nine exemptions to the statute. This amendment was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson, despite his misgivings, on July 4, 1966, and went into effect the following year.
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by Canswerist® ▶ aka Altaloman®

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A 'moniker' for the 'social current see' about common interest developments, aka HOAs, or homeowner associations, also property owner associations (POAs). These communities, while private governments, function much like cities with more than 9 million residents in these localities in California. As such, ALTACITIES, "alternate cities," are larger than the combined populations of the four largest cities in the state, Los Angeles, San Diego, San Jose and San Francisco.